Red Umbrella Project

Amplifying the voices of people in the sex trades

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My Dad was in my room looking for something and
found my business card. Not the one with my real name,
or even my almost-real name, but full fake name, partial
nudity. He is now holding this card, the card I use to
advertise sexual services, in his hand, and I can tell he
wants to talk to me about it. A slow burn in my throat
starts to close it. My ears are burning, too. Here he is now,
beginning to ask a question, “Do you…”

- LD Sorrow 

Read the rest of this story and more sex worker memoirs in Prose & Lore: Issue 1

Filed under sexwork sexworker prostitution prose&lore family redumbrellaproject redup memoir

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(via Uganda’s gay rights and sex worker activists answer your questions about HIV prevention | netnebraska.org)

NewsHour Viewer 2: To protect sexual health, what do you find to be the most successful interventions for sex workers, and for those who are LGBT?

Daisy Nakato: As a sex work organization, WONETHA can answer the first part of this question. Those of us who have worked on sex worker rights issues know from experience that the most successful interventions need to be community-based (led by sex workers) and rights-based (an approach that recognizes our right to engage in sex work and to live free from discrimination and violence) as well as structural and not solely biomedical (such as medication or HIV testing). Sex workers need to have a meaningful voice in programming, at all stages of planning and implementation; sex workers need to be recognized as experts in their own lives.

In addition, sex workers need to be empowered to access health services that are free from stigma and discrimination. We have long known that structural interventions such as the decriminalization of sex work would go the furthest in improving health for sex workers.

(via Uganda’s gay rights and sex worker activists answer your questions about HIV prevention | netnebraska.org)

NewsHour Viewer 2: To protect sexual health, what do you find to be the most successful interventions for sex workers, and for those who are LGBT?

Daisy Nakato: As a sex work organization, WONETHA can answer the first part of this question. Those of us who have worked on sex worker rights issues know from experience that the most successful interventions need to be community-based (led by sex workers) and rights-based (an approach that recognizes our right to engage in sex work and to live free from discrimination and violence) as well as structural and not solely biomedical (such as medication or HIV testing). Sex workers need to have a meaningful voice in programming, at all stages of planning and implementation; sex workers need to be recognized as experts in their own lives.

In addition, sex workers need to be empowered to access health services that are free from stigma and discrimination. We have long known that structural interventions such as the decriminalization of sex work would go the furthest in improving health for sex workers.

Filed under sex work hiv aids uganda activism daisy nakato

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There is an electric energy in that corner of the room:
the music, the pace, bottle after bottle of Cristal popping,
the rush of extreme celebration. Tonight, I forget to
remember that I’m supposed to be ashamed. I forget to
remember how much I’m supposed to hate this game. I’m
getting paid to hang out and play. This is a mutually
beneficial fantasy. They get to be that player that knows
how to keep the “dime pieces” running his way. I get to be
that “I deserve every bit of money in your pocket just cuz
I look like me” kinda chick. THIS is an excellent night at
the night job.

- Essence Revealed

Read the rest of this story and more sex worker memoirs in Prose & Lore: Issue 1

Filed under Sexwork sexworkers strippersonly prose&lore essencerevealed memoir redumbrellaproject redup

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All Grown Up Under Hip Hop -

Filed under feminism hip hop