Red Umbrella Project

Amplifying the voices of people in the sex trades

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…he was full of excitement about his summer happenings—”I went to seven shows in 29 days, man! It was amazing!”—and more importantly, his new girlfriend, who he met at one of the jam-band shows he loves so much. She’s AWESOME, she’s smart, she’s so frickin’ hot, “and she loves Phish too!” In short, this new girlfriend is everything good for Surfer Dude… except she doesn’t know about Wendy, the hot-lesbian-bitch alter ego that he puts on to role-play with me once or twice a month.

“l still want to do Wendy every now and then,” said Surfer Dude, “but I’m probably going to be calling you less.” I make the supportive, believing noises, and say the congratulatory things that he clearly wants to hear, but in my head I’m going, “Fuckin’ TELL HER ABOUT WENDY!” Just TELL her. Suck it up and talk about role-play, and what has she done, and what have you done, and what could you do together? She’s a free-wheeling, jam-band-following type. I DON’T THINK SHE’S GOING TO FREAK OUT.

Do clients ever leave the nest? |

Should sex workers encourage clients to talk to their partners about their kinks?

Filed under sex work fetish fantasy clients

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gradientlair:

Prison Is Not Feminist: These photographs are of attendees at the exhibition of No Selves To Defend that was held on July 18, 2014 and were taken by photographer Sarah Jane Rhee. The sign was designed by Antonia Clifford.

According to @prisonculture, this is how they framed the actual exhibit:

We decided that we would anchor it with the stories of Celia (a 19th century enslaved black woman) and Marissa (a 21st century unjustly prosecuted black woman).

All of the photographs created with the sign can be seen on the Prison Is Not Feminist blog, and a few photos of the exhibit itself are on Prison Culture blog.

(via strugglingtobeheard)

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janetmock:

endofsomerland:

"[sex workers] came to merchant street and took control of their bodies—bodies that were radical in their mere existence in this misogynistic, transphobic, elitist world[…]The varied, often conflicting portraits these women presented shaped my developing composition of womanhood. When I am asked how I define womanhood, I often quote feminist author Simone de Beauvoir: "one is not born, but rather becomes a woman."[…]This short, powerful statement assured me that I have the freedom, in spite of and because of my birth, body, race, gender expectations, and economic resources, to define myself for myself and for others." -Janet Mock (Redefining Realness)

Love when readers share their quotes that resonate with them with me. Thanks for reading Redefining Realness.

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I slowly moved towards the stairs, checking my breath,
fixing my hair, moving all my valuables into zippered
hidden pockets in my bag. As I reached the top of the first
landing, I noticed that the colors of the walls did not
change, the building did not get nicer and there was a
distinct medical/nursing home vibe to it. Pale hospital
green walls surrounded me. There were dirty trays of halfeaten
food outside doors, American flags hanging on the
walls, tattered paper candy canes on doors, doors left wide
open with televisions blasting, but not a person in sight. I
held my head up and got ready to assume my dominant
persona: Josh the fisting power top. Josh wouldn’t not let
this shit get to him. Josh would command the space, he
would pound his Timberland boots down the hall and let
his presence be known. Most importantly I WAS Josh and
I was not going to let the color of a wall and a strange
building that smelled like piss get to me.

- Josh Ryley

Read the rest of this story and more sex worker memoirs in Prose & Lore: Issue 1

Filed under Sexwork sexworkers prose&lore memoir redumbrellaproject redup prostitution escort